Behringer powerplay p1 personal ear monitor?

Art Welter

Senior
Jan 11, 2011
867
33
28
Florida
Ive heard musicians damaging ears from in -ear monitors due to circuits or malfunctions in the board while performing. Is this device safe?

Nothing in the specifications would indicate the P1 any more or less "safe" than any other device with a maximum output of 9.5dBu, about 2.3 volts.
 

David Morison

Freshman
Aug 21, 2012
189
15
18
Aberdeen, Scotland
Always make sure every device in the sound system is powered up before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure every connection is made before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure every musician knows not to unplug without making sure they're muted first.
Always make sure every instrument, cable and other device in the sound system is well maintained before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure phantom power is switched on (where needed) before putting your earbuds in.

Always have the engineer start your monitor mix with all channels down, and have the engineer bring things up slowly, rather than have them rough in the mix before you even have your earbuds in.

These steps should eliminate most of the sources of unexpected noises through your mix, however you still can't guarantee there won't be feedback if say a singer points their mic directly at a loudspeaker.
 

Debbie dunkley

Freshman
Sep 28, 2014
12
0
1
It is a very good little unit and so is the P2. In fact they are the only 2 items I have of Behringer - I looked into this a while back and the information I was given was that both units have limiters built in to help with hearing protection. Of course as stated earlier, care should be taken when using iem systems of any kind.
Main differences between P1 and P2: The P1 is dual XLR inputs, AC/DC power or battery powered and has the stereo/mono switch on the outside. The P2 is much smaller, single XLR/TRS input, is only battery powered and has the stereo/mono switch inside the battery casing.
 

Roy Andrews

New member
Nov 20, 2021
23
6
3
Panama
The Behringer P2 is awesome for the price. It has 2 faults that are not (in my opinion) deal breakers. The first is that the mechanical release button that holds the case on is not in the dead center of the device, so even though the steel case / shell should in theory fit on the guts in either direction, it does not. If you get the case on backwards while changing batteries on a dark stage, there is a small gap at one end. This really doesn't matter in the slightest to it's usability, but it says to me that a co-op student did the mechanical drawings, and nobody checked his/her work before sending to manufacturing.

The second issue might be more problematic, depending on your situation. The unit uses 2x AAA batteries (works find with rechargeable batteries BTW). The battery holder is just far enough away from the case that if you drop the unit, and it happens to fall more or less on the serial number side, then one of both batteries can dislodge just enough so the unit loses power (if it was on) or won't power on (thus looks broken). Pop the cover open, push the batteries back into the clippy holder, and you are good to go again. I've never had the batteries fall out except when the unit is dropped. You could avoid this by putting a small piece of medium dense foam from some packing material inside the case, however the design of the unit does not allow that this foam could be glued or stuck in place, you'd just have to take it out, change batts, push it back in again.

Overall, it's very durable, and excellent value for the money.

In terms of hearing damage, that is really more of a sound engineer thing... sound engineers need to learn to adjust volumes slowly, check with the musicians as they make the adjustments and NEVER just jam sliders up to 0 or above randomly. I work mostly in smaller venues, so I'm both FoH & monitor engineer. I always get up on stage with the band, go through each musician's in ears mix one by one to get a pleasant but usable volume (at least for those who do not know or want to use the personal in ears apps for my mixers), and I always remind them that the P2 has a volume control, if it gets too loud, turn it down. Modern solid state electronics is extremely reliable, so the idea that these boxes are somehow going to break in such a way as to damage the musician's hearing is, in my opinion, beyond ridiculous. It is 1000x more likely that the sound engineer or the musician him/herself causes the hearing damage... but it's easier to blame the box than to accept responsibility for causing harm to others or oneself.
 

Alex Herrera

New member
Jul 29, 2022
6
0
1
41
Texas
Always make sure every device in the sound system is powered up before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure every connection is made before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure every musician knows not to unplug without making sure they're muted first.
Always make sure every instrument, cable and other device in the sound system is well maintained before putting your earbuds in.
Always make sure phantom power is switched on (where needed) before putting your earbuds in.

Always have the engineer start your monitor mix with all channels down, and have the engineer bring things up slowly, rather than have them rough in the mix before you even have your earbuds in.

These steps should eliminate most of the sources of unexpected noises through your mix, however you still can't guarantee there won't be feedback if say a singer points their mic directly at a loudspeaker.
Oh wow thank-you I will keep all of that in mind. I wasnt away of all that.
 

Alex Herrera

New member
Jul 29, 2022
6
0
1
41
Texas
It is a very good little unit and so is the P2. In fact they are the only 2 items I have of Behringer - I looked into this a while back and the information I was given was that both units have limiters built in to help with hearing protection. Of course as stated earlier, care should be taken when using iem systems of any kind.
Main differences between P1 and P2: The P1 is dual XLR inputs, AC/DC power or battery powered and has the stereo/mono switch on the outside. The P2 is much smaller, single XLR/TRS input, is only battery powered and has the stereo/mono switch inside the battery casing.
Thankyou I will be careful
 

Alex Herrera

New member
Jul 29, 2022
6
0
1
41
Texas
The Behringer P2 is awesome for the price. It has 2 faults that are not (in my opinion) deal breakers. The first is that the mechanical release button that holds the case on is not in the dead center of the device, so even though the steel case / shell should in theory fit on the guts in either direction, it does not. If you get the case on backwards while changing batteries on a dark stage, there is a small gap at one end. This really doesn't matter in the slightest to it's usability, but it says to me that a co-op student did the mechanical drawings, and nobody checked his/her work before sending to manufacturing.

The second issue might be more problematic, depending on your situation. The unit uses 2x AAA batteries (works find with rechargeable batteries BTW). The battery holder is just far enough away from the case that if you drop the unit, and it happens to fall more or less on the serial number side, then one of both batteries can dislodge just enough so the unit loses power (if it was on) or won't power on (thus looks broken). Pop the cover open, push the batteries back into the clippy holder, and you are good to go again. I've never had the batteries fall out except when the unit is dropped. You could avoid this by putting a small piece of medium dense foam from some packing material inside the case, however the design of the unit does not allow that this foam could be glued or stuck in place, you'd just have to take it out, change batts, push it back in again.

Overall, it's very durable, and excellent value for the money.

In terms of hearing damage, that is really more of a sound engineer thing... sound engineers need to learn to adjust volumes slowly, check with the musicians as they make the adjustments and NEVER just jam sliders up to 0 or above randomly. I work mostly in smaller venues, so I'm both FoH & monitor engineer. I always get up on stage with the band, go through each musician's in ears mix one by one to get a pleasant but usable volume (at least for those who do not know or want to use the personal in ears apps for my mixers), and I always remind them that the P2 has a volume control, if it gets too loud, turn it down. Modern solid state electronics is extremely reliable, so the idea that these boxes are somehow going to break in such a way as to damage the musician's hearing is, in my opinion, beyond ridiculous. It is 1000x more likely that the sound engineer or the musician him/herself causes the hearing damage... but it's easier to blame the box than to accept responsibility for causing harm to others or oneself.
Very interesting. Gladly appreciate your input.