Help with old record player

Pieter swanepoel

New member
Dec 1, 2019
1
0
1
23
East London
I just inherited a old Telefunken TX 2000 record player from my grandfather.

Wanna get it hooked up but I'm not so savvy on the sound wiring side lol. I'm used to just the usual + and -. Unfortunately I'm presented with a single hole stating speaker left or right. Any help would be appreciated!15751818972537530530708523832671.jpg
 

Kevin McDonough

Freshman
Jan 3, 2016
34
2
8
39
They look like phono line level connections, possibly using Phono (or RCA) connectors like these....



which would mean they don't power the speakers themselves. That signal has to be fed into an amplifier, which is then connected to the speakers, either a home HiFi type amplifier for use at home, or a PA amplifier (through a mixer of some sort) if you're using it with a PA system.

One extra thing to note is you may also need a mixer or amplifier that has an input socket on it specifically designed for record player inputs.

The depth of the grove on the record controls how much bass is in the music, however accurately representing the bass would need very deep groves, and the plastic records would have to be much thicker and heavier. So as the record is made, a specific EQ curve is applied to the music signal to roll off some of the bass. When played back, the opposite filter needs to be used to add the bass back in again and bring the record back to normal. This is why on many home HiFi amplifiers and DJ mixers etc, they have specific inputs for record players, separate from other devices (CD players etc).

In your case, it actually looks as if the matching output filter may well already be included, and your record player can be connected straight to the amplifier, but if it doesn't sound right when you do, and is lacking bass, that could be one of the reasons why so is something to bear in mind.



K
 
Last edited:
They look like phono line level connections, possibly using Phono (or RCA) connectors <snip>

which would mean they don't power the speakers themselves. That signal has to be fed into an amplifier, which is then connected to the speakers, either a home HiFi type amplifier for use at home, or a PA amplifier (through a mixer of some sort) if you're using it with a PA system.

<snip>
Some older home audio gear did use RCA connectors for speaker outputs (generally in the "several watt" range), so in that case, the center pin would be + and the ring would be -. It won't be loud, but it should be listenable