Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

Nick Andrews

Sophomore
Feb 27, 2014
106
1
18
Hi guys,

I've been Looking for a small format but high output single 18 inch sub for ballroom / wedding / corporate gatherings. I have a large arsenal of Yamaha DSR112 boxes that are working out great for us as a utility speakers, small mains, and for wedges. The DSR118 was frowned upon by almost everyone I spoke with output wise, but this looks like it COULD be a lot better from the specs and features, I contacted my local dealer and they said they are expecting them mid to late october, and gave me a pretty killer price.

Any thoughts? thinking of checking out a pair....
 

Chris Tsanjoures

Freshman
Jan 18, 2013
44
1
0
Putnam, CT
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

A pair would probably do the trick for a tame event, but the tops will out run them. I would spring for 4, using two a side to make a pseudo double 18. With only a pair you will be longing for headroom.
 

Gordon Brinton

Freshman
Jul 18, 2015
28
0
0
Near Harrisburg, PA, USA
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

The DXS118 and DSR118 are somewhat similar, but offer different sound. If I am not mistaken, they both have the same power amp and DSP. The cabinets, however, differ a lot.

The DXS118 is a band-pass design. This design boasts high output, but usually only at one specific frequency or narrow frequency range. In this case, it will always have a loud volume peak between 50 and 70 Hz and it will always lack volume between 70 and 120 Hz. This is referred to as "one note bass". If you EQ the subs to tame or flatten out that peak area then you will never get close to reaching the max SPL as specified. (Not that you could have anyway. Those numbers are exaggerated.) The DXS cabinet is made of plywood for strength.

DSR118 is a ported (bass reflex) design. This one is designed to sound more even in volume across the usable range. There may be a slight volume peak here or there due to cabinet resonance, but not intentional like the band-pass design. This box is not designed to achieve raw volume, but instead to sound more musical across its range. It is made of particle board which gives the speaker a richer sound quality than plywood. But you may not want to allow rock stars to stand on them.

I own a pair of the DSR118's and they do indeed sound sweet. They pair with my DSR112's perfectly. I do mostly rock bands in bars and they have not disappointed me yet. I get plenty of punch and volume out of them when needed and still have headroom left over, (albeit I have not used them in a very large room yet). If you just want loud subs at the kick drum frequency, then choose the DXS. But loud peaks are not always better for other instruments. I wouldn't take my advice from spec-critics who don't actually own the products either. Choosing between these two subs should be based more on your needs rather than specs.

EDIT: I do have a gig coming in November in a larger room. I'll let you know then how they hold up.
 
Last edited:

Nick Andrews

Sophomore
Feb 27, 2014
106
1
18
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

The DXS118 and DSR118 are somewhat similar, but offer different sound. If I am not mistaken, they both have the same power amp and DSP. The cabinets, however, differ a lot.

The DXS118 is a band-pass design. This design boasts high output, but usually only at one specific frequency or narrow frequency range. In this case, it will always have a loud volume peak between 50 and 70 Hz and it will always lack volume between 70 and 120 Hz. This is referred to as "one note bass". If you EQ the subs to tame or flatten out that peak area then you will never get close to reaching the max SPL as specified. (Not that you could have anyway. Those numbers are exaggerated.) The DXS cabinet is made of plywood for strength.

DSR118 is a ported (bass reflex) design. This one is designed to sound more even in volume across the usable range. There may be a slight volume peak here or there due to cabinet resonance, but not intentional like the band-pass design. This box is not designed to achieve raw volume, but instead to sound more musical across its range. It is made of particle board which gives the speaker a richer sound quality than plywood. But you may not want to allow rock stars to stand on them.

I own a pair of the DSR118's and they do indeed sound sweet. They pair with my DSR112's perfectly. I do mostly rock bands in bars and they have not disappointed me yet. I get plenty of punch and volume out of them when needed and still have headroom left over, (albeit I have not used them in a very large room yet). If you just want loud subs at the kick drum frequency, then choose the DXS. But loud peaks are not always better for other instruments. I wouldn't take my advice from spec-critics who don't actually own the products either. Choosing between these two subs should be based more on your needs rather than specs.

EDIT: I do have a gig coming in November in a larger room. I'll let you know then how they hold up.

Gordon do you have a pair of dxs18 ?
 

Debbie dunkley

Freshman
Sep 28, 2014
11
0
1
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

I've been using DSR112's paired with PRX718's for some time now and I LOVE the combo. This set up is sufficient for most of the bars/clubs we play. The PRX will perform much better than the Yamaha subs mentioned here. I have no idea why the Yamaha tops are so much more efficient than the subs in the same series…..
 

Nick Andrews

Sophomore
Feb 27, 2014
106
1
18
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

I've been using DSR112's paired with PRX718's for some time now and I LOVE the combo. This set up is sufficient for most of the bars/clubs we play. The PRX will perform much better than the Yamaha subs mentioned here. I have no idea why the Yamaha tops are so much more efficient than the subs in the same series…..
: knocks on wood :

the dsr112 boxes are proving to be great utility boxes for us, they do pretty well pretty much anywhere we have thrown them for a small wedge, main or fill.

lets compare the published specs between the prx718xlf and the dsx18

dxs18
18" Powered subwoofer, Band-pass type
-10db response 32hz - 120hz
18" cone, Voice Coil:4"
Dynamic:1020W / Continuous: 800W
136dB SPL
49.7kg (110lbs)
m20 thread and regular 1 3/8 pole mount
has caster and cover option which i find is pretty dang important....
Material: Plywood (LINE-X®, Black)

prx718xlf

System Type: Self Powered 18" subwoofer
Maximum SPL Output: 134 dB peak
Frequency Range (-10 dB): 30 Hz - 103 Hz
Frequency Response (±3 dB): 35 Hz – 87 Hz
Power Rating: 1500W
AC Power Input: 100V - 240V ∼ 50/60 Hz
Speaker:
LF Driver: 1 x JBL 2278G 460 mm (18 in) woofer
Enclosure: Rectangular, 18 mm, plywood
Transport: 2 x injection molded handles with backing cup
Finish: Obsidian DuraFlex™ finish
Gross Weight: 45.0 kg (100.0 lb)

no wheel option unless you modify the box or add caster boards


thoughts.... ?
 

Debbie dunkley

Freshman
Sep 28, 2014
11
0
1
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

: knocks on wood :

the dsr112 boxes are proving to be great utility boxes for us, they do pretty well pretty much anywhere we have thrown them for a small wedge, main or fill.

lets compare the published specs between the prx718xlf and the dsx18

dxs18
18" Powered subwoofer, Band-pass type
-10db response 32hz - 120hz
18" cone, Voice Coil:4"
Dynamic:1020W / Continuous: 800W
136dB SPL
49.7kg (110lbs)
m20 thread and regular 1 3/8 pole mount
has caster and cover option which i find is pretty dang important....
Material: Plywood (LINE-X®, Black)

prx718xlf

System Type: Self Powered 18" subwoofer
Maximum SPL Output: 134 dB peak
Frequency Range (-10 dB): 30 Hz - 103 Hz
Frequency Response (±3 dB): 35 Hz – 87 Hz
Power Rating: 1500W
AC Power Input: 100V - 240V ∼ 50/60 Hz
Speaker:
LF Driver: 1 x JBL 2278G 460 mm (18 in) woofer
Enclosure: Rectangular, 18 mm, plywood
Transport: 2 x injection molded handles with backing cup
Finish: Obsidian DuraFlex™ finish
Gross Weight: 45.0 kg (100.0 lb)

no wheel option unless you modify the box or add caster boards


thoughts.... ?
Actually the PRX718xlf is only 81lbs compared to 110 lbs for the DXS18.
 

Sean Zurbrick

Freshman
Jan 15, 2011
57
0
0
Columbus, OH
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

I've done several years with a few different band pass subs in the past. Usually the trade-off is high output with a smaller box at the expense of the "one not wonder" sound. Given that the Yamaha's are large and heavy, I don't really see an any advantages over something like the PRX718XLF, which is what I'm using currently along with a pair of RCF 745A tops. I can attest the PRX boxes get low, although the SPL spec is a bit optimistic, especially if you're tuning them to go low. Yamaha has always been big on the -10dB spec, which I find relatively worthless. I also don't see a -3 spec anywhere nor a graph showing the output. That leads me to guess the -3 spec is somewhere around 40 or even 45 Hz, which is fine, but also why they don't tell you the spec.
 

David Morison

Freshman
Aug 21, 2012
133
5
18
Aberdeen, Scotland
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

Yamaha has always been big on the -10dB spec, which I find relatively worthless. I also don't see a -3 spec anywhere nor a graph showing the output. That leads me to guess the -3 spec is somewhere around 40 or even 45 Hz, which is fine, but also why they don't tell you the spec.
It's perhaps a little harder to find but it is certainly available - on http://www.yamahaproaudio.com/global/en/products/speakers/dxs/downloads.jsp then select DXS Series: Frequency Response.

HTH,
David.
 

Sean Zurbrick

Freshman
Jan 15, 2011
57
0
0
Columbus, OH
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

It's perhaps a little harder to find but it is certainly available - on http://www.yamahaproaudio.com/global/en/products/speakers/dxs/downloads.jsp then select DXS Series: Frequency Response.

HTH,
David.
Thanks. So I wonder if that's the "new trick" on the block...... Use different DSP settings for different specs. It looks like the low frequency spec is when using one setting and the max SPL might be using another. If you can't have both at the same time it's kind of disingenuous if you ask me.
 

Scott Bolt

Junior
Mar 4, 2013
386
0
0
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

The XLF appears to have a much flatter response: https://www.jblpro.com/ProductAttachments/JBL_PRX718XLF_v5.pdf

Eyeballing it the XLF looks to have a -3db of around 40-85. The Yamaha is about the same, but much less even in its response.

I also use the DSR112's over the XLF's. Those subs are pretty remarkable in both their weight, and output for the money you pay for them IMO.

I would still love to hear from someone who has both to compare them!
 

John Chiara

Senior
Jan 11, 2011
931
0
0
Troy, NY
Re: Thoughts on Yamaha dxs18 sub

Thanks. So I wonder if that's the "new trick" on the block...... Use different DSP settings for different specs. It looks like the low frequency spec is when using one setting and the max SPL might be using another. If you can't have both at the same time it's kind of disingenuous if you ask me.
Hmm...the 12" and 15" band pass subs are fan cooled...and draw more power than the convection cooled 18'?
 

Zeus Castrol

New member
Sep 5, 2019
1
0
1
30
Bristol
Hey guys, I recently bought a Yamaha DXS18 Subwoofer and decided to pair it with castors (casters if you're in the US).

The official SPW-1 castors are a crazy rip-off price of £100 a set.

So I went for aftermarket units.

This sent me on a wild goose chase looking for the exact measurements I need.

I looked through all the first few website results on google for castors and none of them had them.

Eventually found a couple of options I want to share on here, to save others the hours of work it took to find them. Amazon has some, but they never put the bolt hole spacing in the title,

and so you end up trawling through page after page of castors looking for that specific information. The plate size they list doesn't give any indication of the bolt spacing either.

I also cannot find any swivel and/or locking castors that also correspond with the bolt hole centres, so all of these are fixed castors without breaks, just like the official SPW-1 units

are.

Also for the record, the weight of the sub is 50kg.

The Yamaha SPW-1 castors are 75mm, and that's the size I went for below (i.e. the polyurethane ones).

For those in doubt, the bolt hole centres you need the castor plate to line up with are 81mm x 40mm. I'd imagine 80mm x 40mm will also work.

Product Links:

A low-quality option but good if you want to buy individual castors, not sets. They allow for 45kg each, but you will only ever rock back on to them with 2 castors, so the load will be shared: https://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/product/coldene-fixed-castor-45kg-grey-563715https://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/product/coldene-fixed-castor-45kg-grey-563715

£20 rubber castors with 100mm wheels: https://www.amazon.co.uk/100mm-Marking-Grey-Rubber-Castors/dp/B074ZWVTZR
£24 polyurethane castors with 75mm wheels: https://www.amazon.co.uk/75mm-Polyurethane-Fixed-Casters-RED/dp/B0751DFWB2
£24 polyurethane castors with 100mm wheels: https://www.amazon.co.uk/100mm-Polyurethane-Fixed-Casters-RED/dp/B07515JHLD
£25 -polyurethane castors with 125mm wheels https://www.amazon.co.uk/125mm-Polyurethane-Fixed-Casters-RED/dp/B07511WDXG
£30 rubber castors with 125mm wheels: https://www.amazon.co.uk/125mm-Marking-Grey-Rubber-Castors/dp/B075118N7N

If anyone has any links to locking/swivel castors with 81mm x 40mm bolt hole centres, please comment. Would be useful when on the roadside and ramps etc.

All in all you can pay 1/5 the price of the Yamaha units and still get a sound result.

Hope that helps someone!