Charity Events

#21
Re: Charity Events

I only do one free gig every year, and it's a recording session for an Elementary school where my former (middle school) band director now teaches. I provide a simple recording rig (laptop + interfaces) and a mic kit etc, along with my time for free. This band director helped me out a lot when I was a kid, and got me on the path to where I am now, so I feel it's a worth while way to pay him back. The past two years however, I have been personally unavailable on the date they picked, and they have hired a local tech that I recommended (at his normal rate) to do the actual recording.

The reason they are willing to hire this tech and pay for him, has a lot to do with my submitting a quote each year to the band director, for what my services would have cost. It's for informational purposes only, but it helps him establish the value of the services with his budget committee, so they understand what things cost, should they have to pay for them. My recommended tech's rate is still quite attractive when compared to my rate + my equipment rental along with my time to mix and finish the project after the fact.

Just my experience.
 
Jan 29, 2013
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#22
Re: Charity Events

Don't be the sucker that does the event for free. Let someone else be that asshole. They're not asking the truck rental company, banner printing company, bleacher renting company, bottled water company, lighting company, or insurance company to do it for free. They just think they can get away with it for audio, don't let them.
Exactly!!!!!:thumbup:
 
Jan 29, 2013
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#23
Re: Charity Events

You might point out the liability insurance issues to those on stage and those in charge. Ask the band if they're prepared to hock their homes to cover any injury even remotely associated with the presence of their gear at said event. Ask the presenters if they're willing to cover liability for those "loaning" their gear.......

This usually turns a light on. If it doesn't, do you really want to be "working" for such clueless folk????

This is assuming, of course, that you yourself actually carry insurance......
I don't carry any insurance at all. But it is something to think about. :idea:
 
Jan 29, 2013
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#24
Re: Charity Events

I'd just want to point out that the band gear is usually quite expensive as well.

Keyz: €5.000, 2xgtr: €8.000, drums: €5.000, bass: €2.500, misc: €1.500 = €22.000 for a mediocre 5-piece rock band...
I know , but they tell them they will set it up and let the others play through it and use it all day for free. sometimes the backline they let the other bands use to save setup time as well. I can't believe they are doing it all for free.
 
#25
I donate my time and gear to one fund raiser a year. I do it because it is run by friends, they help schlep and set up, and the work they do for differently abled kids is important.

I am doing a fund raiser tomorrow. They hired me for it.

I will be doing a 2 day fund raising event for the 3rd year next month. The first year I gave them a good price but right off the rate sheets with a little rental discount. Year 2 they wanted to pinch some and promised load in/out labor. The help didn't show on time so I ended up busting my butt making the event start on time. This year they are paying for my crew. They still get a repeat customer discount for the gear but all else is off the rate sheet. They are happy and so am I.


Sent from my iPad HD
 
#26
I donate my time and gear to one fund raiser a year. I do it because it is run by friends, they help schlep and set up, and the work they do for differently abled kids is important.

I am doing a fund raiser tomorrow. They hired me for it.

I will be doing a 2 day fund raising event for the 3rd year next month. The first year I gave them a good price but right off the rate sheets with a little rental discount. Year 2 they wanted to pinch some and promised load in/out labor. The help didn't show on time so I ended up busting my butt making the event start on time. This year they are paying for my crew. They still get a repeat customer discount for the gear but all else is off the rate sheet. They are happy and so am I.


Sent from my iPad HD
I have learned on multiple occasions to not rely on free labor.

Only free labor I can remember as being on time and useful was at the United States Coast Guard Academy.

Sent from my XT907 2
 
#28
Re: Charity Events

Don't be the sucker that does the event for free. Let someone else be that asshole. They're not asking the truck rental company, banner printing company, bleacher renting company, bottled water company, lighting company, or insurance company to do it for free. They just think they can get away with it for audio, don't let them.
Never do anything for free for any of the official charities. I have played countless fundraisers for individuals in small clubs - some of them I didn't even know but was asked by someone to do the gig so I did. Most of these events were me playing as a band for a short set and sometimes my guys would come along and other times I would just sit in with whoever was there. It's flattering to think that my name somehow helps make the event more profitable. There have been some events that I've worked like a dog all day and all night providing PA and full backline for multiple acts but these are for people I know and they are usually either very sick or in some cases they have already gone to that big jam in the sky and we're just doing some sort of tribute to them. Some of the PA gigs have payed a little but the band type are all freebees.

New Orleans has a tradition of funeral parades in the streets to honor musicians. Our area seems to do a lot of before and after multi band events to honor and raise money for bills or tombstones. What does your area do for people?
 

Dick Rees

Curmudgeonly Scandihoovian
Jan 11, 2011
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St Paul, MN
#29
Re: Charity Events

Gene....

In re your "work like a dog" comment:

The rule of thumb on "good cause" events seems often to be for the promoter(s) to get up at the end of the event, pat themselves on the back and give no mention at all to all the "grunts" who actually made the thing happen.

Is it so hard to say "thanks" to everyone?

grumpy old guy out
 
#30
Re: Charity Events

Gene....

In re your "work like a dog" comment:

The rule of thumb on "good cause" events seems often to be for the promoter(s) to get up at the end of the event, pat themselves on the back and give no mention at all to all the "grunts" who actually made the thing happen.

Is it so hard to say "thanks" to everyone?

grumpy old guy out

I agree and there is one particular organizer who tends to do this to me every time. Sometimes I'm "busy" when he calls. :roll: It's always complicated buy the fact that all of these events are for actual people in our area. If you ever see my name associated with any official charity event you can be sure that they are paying us something - but people on the other hand need a pat on the back to let them know someone cares.
 
Jan 21, 2011
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Atlanta, GA
#31
Re: Charity Events

It is always good to give something back to the community. I try to treat it like I would if I did not own a sound company. Every year there are some causes I volunteer my time to because they are near and dear to my heart. Usually I bring a sound system. There is one particular event every year that I asked to be a part of.
 
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Jan 29, 2013
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#32
Re: Charity Events

Around my neck of the woods , if you do one event for free , word gets out and then every event will want the sound for free. I am a giving person but people DO and WILL take advantage of you around here if you let them.
 
#33
Re: Charity Events

For charity events, I will give a slightly discounted price, but I learned my lesson about free event. After my equipment had been damaged (I didn't have insurance at this point in my career) and I had to pay out of pocket to repair it, I was done with free events. The end price for charity events depends on the night. If they disrespect me all night, it's a far drive, or there are problems, I keep the money. If the event is successful, and all goes well, I will occasionally donate money back. This allows me to cover my costs, while still being able to help the charity.
 
Feb 20, 2013
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Richmond, VA
#35
Re: Charity Events

I give free labor on these occasions, and these only:
-My church
-My good friends or old tech friends from school (usually in club gigs for shits and giggles)
-Family asks for little stuff

I give free equipment on these occasions:
-Never

Just a thought.
 
Jan 21, 2011
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Atlanta, GA
#36
Re: Charity Events

One has to remember that it is not "free" if you do this. It often costs in excess of $100 just for fuel for my truck to do a local event. I am 45 miles or better from town to my house in the country. There is also wear and tear on everything. I am donating not only time and equipment but actual cash outlay to do the one main charity event I do each year. As I said earlier I would donate to this event anyway because it is near and dear to my heart, I just happen to have a sound company. Are you willing to write a check for a sizeable donation to the cause? If you are then by all means give your time and use of your equipment. If you are not then I strongly suggest you think it out before being a "sucker" unless you have some other motivation.

Since this is JV, I will add one other possibility. If you are just starting out and want to get some time and experience behind your rig, donating to an event that is having a few local bands play will get your feet wet and the bands are usually just glad to have any system to play through. It is at least a resume and confidence builder if it works out well. You can work out any issues that come up in a much more forgiving environment. Everyone has to start somewhere. For everyone else I believe most of the above posts apply.
 
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#37
Dan Pallotta on what's wrong with how we think about charity

I heard a great piece on the TED Radio Hour podcast yesterday.

Check out Dan Pallotta's spoke on what's wrong with how we think about charity:
TED Radio Hour : NPR

The rest of the podcast was pretty good, too.

You can find the whole TED talk with a quick google search, but I really like how the Radio Hour podcast boiled it down.

He really hit's the nail on the head, and I imagine is partially responsible for helping to develop a lot of the work that we all have on our calendars, still.

He makes a strong argument that if more fund-raising efforts were treated like real business than bake sales, there would be more money raised and more benefit to our economy. Worth a listen.
 
Dec 10, 2012
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Adelaide, Australia
#38
Re: Dan Pallotta on what's wrong with how we think about charity

I'm with the suggestion to donate your time if the cause is near and dear, but your equipment, never (doesn't have to be hired for market rates, but at least something token).

Also seconding the advice to do it if you happen to be in need of/want the experience.
 
May 17, 2011
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#39
Re: Dan Pallotta on what's wrong with how we think about charity

I first-off ask to see their list of sponsors. Generally the event organizer(s) will ask me why? I explain they're asking me to make a $X,XXX.xx contribution to their event in services... and I'll explain that if I'm in like company in supporting their event, in-that they've secured similar level donations of goods, services, or cash from other small businesses in the area in support of their event, then we'll talk. Otherwise I'll consider making a donation on-par with their other donors that are my peers.

I've had two events over they years that stepped up to the plate and delivered... and I do those two events yearly for free (and they're both very good events).

Not that I'm a heartless tight-wad... it's just that I'm of the opinion that if you're going to do something for free... stay away from doing things that really suck for free... and somehow you gotta have a system to read the tea leaves... the above is my system.