Wireless Squelch

Mar 3, 2011
992
14
18
Vermont
vtaudiovisual.com
#1
Just wanted to Clarify. My Sennheiser units have a low, medium high setting.
Low= more distance/More chance of interference
Med=safe place
High=Less distance / Less chance of interference.

Used to know this from experience on some older stuff with the squelch potentiometer but it seems to have escaped me. Wikipedia seems to back up my previous statement but just wanted to double check that "low" referred to the squelch being more open.
 
#3
Pretty much what you said. Squelch is basically like a noise gate. If the incoming signal is below the squelch threshold, it will be negated or ducked down. The squelch is designed more to reduce the noise floor of the wireless signal and prevent unwanted radio interference from passing through.

With a really low squelch setting, a small signal can easily pass through and this is good if your presenter is really quiet or you are at a further distance from the receiver and need it to open readily. If you have a loud presenter and are really close to the receiver, then a higher squelch can be used to reduce the noise floor and potential radio interference from getting through.
 

Tim McCulloch

Graduate Student
Jan 11, 2011
2,888
24
38
Wichita KS USA
#4
Pretty much what you said. Squelch is basically like a noise gate. If the incoming signal is below the squelch threshold, it will be negated or ducked down. The squelch is designed more to reduce the noise floor of the wireless signal and prevent unwanted radio interference from passing through.

With a really low squelch setting, a small signal can easily pass through and this is good if your presenter is really quiet or you are at a further distance from the receiver and need it to open readily. If you have a loud presenter and are really close to the receiver, then a higher squelch can be used to reduce the noise floor and potential radio interference from getting through.
Eh... not with FM. Squelch at its most basic is about the RF level, not the audio level. Because communications have to work in high RF environments where RF-level squelch won't work well, we had CTCSS (continuous tone coded squelch system) and later, digital squelch systems. At no point does AF enter into it unless these is so little carrier modulation that signal is indistinguishable from the demodulated noise floor, but again that isn't about the squelch.