60 Degree DIY Mid Hi - AKA PM60

Sunny posty

New member
Jul 7, 2020
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Amsterdam
Hello, after recefing the dwg file by email form peeter, my router guy say he need a big job to convert it to be useble for his machines.
You guys how have had the wood routed, also had this problem or is my router guy, jus using diffrent program, so the file is not compatible.
 

Kevin McDonough

Freshman
Jan 3, 2016
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Hello, after recefing the dwg file by email form peeter, my router guy say he need a big job to convert it to be useble for his machines.
You guys how have had the wood routed, also had this problem or is my router guy, jus using diffrent program, so the file is not compatible.

The information that comes in the DWG file has all the exact dimensions for each piece of wood that's needed to build the speaker. However this in itself isn't ready to just plug straight into a CNC router.

Some work is needed to take the CAD file and put it into the CNC program that runs the machine. You need to work out how you're going to take all the various pieces that need cut and lay them out on the actual plywood boards, program in all of the tool paths and where cuts need to be made, where to route joints and handle holes and holes for the drivers and ports etc so the machine knows how to cut up the boards into all of the pieces you need.

This is usually programmed in something like Mach 3/4 or the Vectric software programs, which then talks to the actual CNC router in it's native language, g-code, and tells the router what to and how to cut the ply.

Someone may have done this already and be able to send you a file with all of the cuts already in place, however these files are somewhat specific to each machine. While the layout of the boards and cuts might be the same, things like how deep the router cuts each pass, how quickly it moves and drills etc, are all dependent on the machine being used, the power of the cutting spindle, the size and quality of the tool bits etc etc.

However even if a previously made CNC file isn't exactly what's needed for your guy's machine, it might get you a big chunk of the way there and only need some small adjustment, and be better than starting from scratch. If you can find out what router software he is using that would be a help too, someone may have a file in the same software.
 
Last edited:

Sunny posty

New member
Jul 7, 2020
6
1
3
44
Amsterdam
The information that comes in the DWG file has all the exact dimensions for each piece of wood that's needed to build the speaker. However this in itself isn't ready to just plug straight into a CNC router.

Some work is needed to take the CAD file and put it into the CNC program that runs the machine. You need to work out how you're going to take all the various pieces that need cut and lay them out on the actual plywood boards, program in all of the tool paths and where cuts need to be made, where to route joints and handle holes and holes for the drivers and ports etc so the machine knows how to cut up the boards into all of the pieces you need.

This is usually programmed in something like Mach 3/4 or the Vectric software programs, which then talks to the actual CNC router in it's native language, g-code, and tells the router what to and how to cut the ply.

Someone may have done this already and be able to send you a file with all of the cuts already in place, however these files are somewhat specific to each machine. While the layout of the boards and cuts might be the same, things like how deep the router cuts each pass, how quickly it moves and drills etc, are all dependent on the machine being used, the power of the cutting spindle, the size and quality of the tool bits etc etc.

However even if a previously made CNC file isn't exactly what's needed for your guy's machine, it might get you a big chunk of the way there and only need some small adjustment, and be better than starting from scratch. If you can find out what router software he is using that would be a help too, someone may have a file in the same software.
Ahh that clears it up thanxx.
wel im beeing charged 1500€ for making this file so,, think that wil leave cnc option out.
:( back to mould making and hand routing it is.
 

Kevin McDonough

Freshman
Jan 3, 2016
37
2
8
40
Yeah, that seems like a lot!

I can understand that this is maybe a reasonable price for commercial work, where the file would be made once and then hundreds or thousands of products would be made, but for a one off set of speakers it seems a lot. A day's work for an experienced machinist should more than be enough to lay out the boards for a speaker, and you'd expect a couple of hundred £ or Euros would be enough to cover their time, not 1500.

There are some people who have made these in the UK I'm sure. If they were able to supply the file they used, it may take a relatively small amount of adjustments to allow it to be used on your guy's machine.